Education (EDUC)

EDUC 040 COMMUNITY SERVICE (1-2 credits)

Involvement in community educational service activity, such as tutoring and assisting in public and private schools, youth recreational programs, community day-care facilities or other approved educational service. Requires 30 clock hours of service for each credit taken.

(EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING)

EDUC 150 FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (3 credits)

An introduction to public schools and the teaching profession, including control of curriculum, the history of American education, philosophies which have influenced educators, how schools are financed, and laws which govern teachers and students. Requires 20 clock hours of field experience in a public school classroom. Students taking this course will complete an MSD criminal history verification.

EDUC 198 SPECIAL TOPICS: JAN TERM TRAVEL (4 credits)

Topics vary according to faculty availability and interest. The major topic offered in the past has been Multicultural Experiences in Education, which has taken place in Hawaii, Montana, England, and Puerto Rico. Offered only as student interest and university resources permit. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Prerequisites: IDST 098 previous fall.

EDUC 200 LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT (4 credits)

Foundations of educational psychology, learning theories and human development. A review of brain research, social and emotional learning, and theories of learning and human development with application to P-12 learners. Viewing through sociocultural lens and integrating culturally responsive teaching throughout each topic. Requires 20 clock hours in a PreK or Middle Level Setting.

Prerequisites: EDUC 150.

EDUC 210 FOUNDATIONS OF INCLUSION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)

Familiarizes students with special education in today's schools, including inclusion, the purpose and history of special education, and the process to identify and serve students in need of specially designed instruction. This overview of special education will explore the etiology, characteristics and needs of students with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, emotional or behavioral disorders, autism spectrum disorders, communication disorders, deafness and hearing loss, blindness and low vision, physical handicaps, health impairments, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and traumatic brain injury. This course further addresses the continuum of services ranging from early childhood special education to transitions to adulthood.

Prerequisites: EDUC 150.

(U.S. PLURALISM)

EDUC 240 FOUNDATIONS FOR TEACHING ESOL (3 credits)

An overview of linguistically and culturally appropriate teaching strategies for teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) in the K-12 classroom. A review of current second language learning theory and application of these theories to planning effective instruction for ELLs. An examination of second language development and cultural issues that affect ELL's academic performance in mainstream classroom.

Prerequisites: EDUC 150.

(U.S. PLURALISM)

EDUC 245 EDUCATIONAL LINGUISTICS AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION FOR ESOL (3 credits)

Current theory and research in first and second language acquisition and issues in linguistics applied to linguistically and culturally diverse students. Topics in language acquisition include historical and current theories, language stages, as well as the factors that influence learning an additional language. Topics in educational linguistics include concepts in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with a focus on classroom applications.

Prerequisites: EDUC 240 or consent of instructor.

EDUC 250 LANGUAGE POLICY, ISSUES AND ADVOCACY FOR ESOL (3 credits)

Analyze and evaluate the historical, political, socio-cultural, and linguistic issues related to local, state, and federal laws and policies regarding English Language Learners (ELL), their families, schools and community. Assess and advocate for ELL students to develop policies and systems of support for ELL students.

Prerequisites: EDUC 240, or consent of instructor.

EDUC 260 EQUITY AND CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE TEACHING (3 credits)

A broad interdisciplinary examination of the school-society relationship in the United States and of the many issues embedded in this relationship including equity in education, equal opportunity, students' diverse needs and assets, human diversity, ideology, politics, and social change. Concepts will connect with pedagogy delopment that is cultraully and linguistically responsive.

Prerequisites: EDUC 150.

(INDIVID/SYSTEMS/SOCIETIES, U.S. PLURALISM)

EDUC 298 SPECIAL TOPICS: JAN TERM TRAVEL (4 credits)

Topics vary according to faculty availability and interest. The major topic offered in the past has been Multicultural Experiences in Education, which has taken place in Hawaii, Montana, England, and Puerto Rico. Offered only as student interest and university resources permit. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Prerequisites: IDST 098 previous fall.

EDUC 301 SUPERVISED TEACHING ASSISTANT (1-12 credits)

Supervised work in a public school setting to develop skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction as well as in establishing a climate conducive to learning. Enrollment by departmental directive for those students who, in the judgment of the department, require more extensive time in a clinical experience at a pre-student teaching level before assuming the responsibilities of student teaching. May be repeated up to a total of 12 credits.

EDUC 302 DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION (4 credits)

A broad interdisciplinary examination of school-society relationship in the United States and of the many issues embedded in this relationship, including equal opportunity, students with special needs, human diversity, ideology, politics, and social change. Register for the Protecting Student & Civil Rights in the Educational Environment test.

Prerequisites: EDUC 230; plus junior standing & Register for Protecting Student & Civil Rights in the Educational Environment test.

(INDIVID/SYSTEMS/SOCIETIES, MAJOR WRITING INTENSIVE, U.S. PLURALISM)

EDUC 303 EDUCATION IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY (4 credits)

Broad interdisciplinary examination of school-society relationship in United States and issues embedded in this relationship, including equal opportunity, human diversity, ideology, politics, and social change. Students will reflect on their own cultural lens and examine issues of difference in U.S. public schools, applying this knowledge to their chosen major and/or profession. OFFERED THROUGH ONLINE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (OCE) ONLY.

(INDIVID/SYSTEMS/SOCIETIES, U.S. PLURALISM)

EDUC 305 GENERAL METHODS AND MANAGEMENT (4 credits)

Techniques of classroom teaching: the planning process, implementation of instruction, assessment of learning, use of educational resources, and classroom management. An introduction to teaching methods and classroom management as a foundation for future development in content specific methods courses.

Prerequisites: EDUC 200.

(MAJOR WRITING INTENSIVE)

EDUC 340 PLANNING IMPLEMENTING, AND ASSESSING INSTRUCTION FOR ESOL (3 credits)

Current curriculum models, materials, teaching approaches and assessment techniques that maximize the language development and academic achievement of English language learners. Emphasizes strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing instruction that enable students in different proficiency levels to access the core curriculum and develop language skills. EDUC 305 must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Prerequisites: EDUC 240.

EDUC 375 TEACHING MULTICULTURAL EXPRESSIVE ARTS (3 credits)

The fundamental way in which we experience our world and express ourselves is through the arts, and arts education develops essential skills and abilities for successful 21st century citizens (ODE). The expressive arts in education include dance, media (digital) arts, music, theater, and visual arts based supported in PK-12 education by the National Core Arts Standards. Methods course in teaching the expressive arts includes a foundation of theory along with opportunities to engage in the expressive arts embedded in a multicultural perspective.

Prerequisites: EDUC 150.

(CREATIVE STUDIES)

EDUC 380 EDUCATION CAREER EXPLORATION (2 credits)

An exploratory course for students interested in working within the field of education outside of the traditional classroom setting. This course is built upon self and career-exploration as well as general career preparation.

EDUC 398 SPECIAL TOPICS: JAN TERM TRAVEL (4 credits)

Topics vary according to faculty availability and interest. The major topic offered in the past has been Multicultural Experiences in Education, which has taken place in Hawaii, Montana, England, and Puerto Rico. Offered only as student interest and university resources permit. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Prerequisites: IDST 098 previous fall.

EDUC 401 TEACHING LITERACY I (4 credits)

Theories, methods, and materials for developing literacy skills for culturally and linguistically diverse students in preK - grade 3. Making data-informed decisions for culturally responsive instruction to meet the needs of individual students, small groups, and the whole class, with attention to students experiencing reading and writing difficulties. Aligning to state adopted English Language Arts standards addressing reading, writing, language, speaking, listening, and reading foundational skills - print concepts, phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, phonics, word recognition, comprehension, and fluency. Integrating children's literature. Prerequisite or corequisite: 260 and 305.

EDUC 402 TEACHING LITERACY II (4 credits)

Theories, methods, and materials for developing literacy skills for culturally and linguistically diverse students in grades 4-8. Making data-informed decisions for culturally responsive instruction to meet the needs of individual students, small groups, and the whole class, with attention to students experiencing reading and writing difficulties. Aligning to state adopted English Language Arts standards addressing reading, writing, language, speaking, listening, and reading foundational skills - phonics, word recognition, comprehension, and fluency. Integrating children's literature, middle grade novels, and young adult literature. Prerequisite or corequisite: 260 and 305, or consent of instructor.

EDUC 430 CONTENT METHODS & CONTENT LITERACY FOR MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS (4 credits)

Curriculum, methods and assessment in the middle and high school content areas. Assignment to sections based upon teaching endorsement. An examination of theories, standards, strategies, and assessment of the content area and content area literacies to enhance learning in secondary subject matter classrooms. Observation and application in middle and high school classrooms. May be repeated for credit with different subjects. Prerequisite or corequisite: 305, or consent of instructor.

EDUC 448 TEACHING MATHEMATICS (3 credits)

Approaches to teaching mathematics with a focus on how children learn concepts, develop skills, and apply mathematics to their daily lives. Overview of the mathematics curriculum. Emphasis on teaching problem solving, number concepts, technology, basic operations with whole and rational numbers, probability and statistics, geometry, measurement, and algebra.

Prerequisites: EDUC 260 and EDUC 305, or consent of instructor.

EDUC 449 TEACHING SCIENCE AND HEALTH/FITNESS (4 credits)

Preparation for teaching science, health and fitness to children (preK-8th). Examination of the following areas of science pedagogy: science curriculum, observation, the nature of science, discrepant events, inquiry, application of the scientific process, reporting findings, resources for teaching science, and assessment of science education. Integrating physical activity and health education subject matter into instruction to enhance the quality of life for students.

Prerequisites: EDUC 260 and EDUC 305, or consent of instructor.

EDUC 450 TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits)

Current trends in social studies, inquiry, discovery and group processes, creative activities and experiences, community resources, technology in social studies, thematic and integrative planning.

Prerequisites: EDUC 200.

EDUC 480 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-5 credits)

Offered fall, January, spring. 1-5 credits.

EDUC 492 STUDENT TEACHING: ELEMENTARY (4-12 credits)

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students in elementary grades. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: Admission to Part and Full-time Student Teaching; for Part-time - fingerprinting and OSP/FBI fingerprint clearance ; for Full-time - completion of Protecting Student & Civil Rights in the Educational Environment Workshop, submission of an official score report with passing scores for the NES Elementary I and II exams and/or NES Subject Area exam(s) and ESOL exam (if seeking an ESOL endorsement) and Special Education (if seeking a Special Education Generalist endorsement)

EDUC 493 STUDENT TEACHING: MIDDLE LEVEL (4-12 credits)

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students in middle level/junior high. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: Admission to Part and Full-time Student Teaching; for Part-time - fingerprinting and OSP/FBI fingerprint clearance ; for Full-time - completion of Protecting Student & Civil Rights in the Educational Environment Workshop, submission of an official score report with passing scores for the NES Elementary I and II exams and/or NES Subject Area exam(s) and ESOL exam (if seeking an ESOL endorsement) and Special Education (if seeking a Special Education Generalist endorsement).

EDUC 494 STUDENT TEACHING: HIGH SCHOOL (4-12 credits)

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students in high school. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: Admission to Part and Full-time Student Teaching; for Part-time - fingerprinting and OSP/FBI fingerprint clearance ; for Full-time - completion of Protecting Student & Civil Rights in the Educational Environment Workshop, submission of an official score report with passing scores for the NES Elementary I and II exams and/or NES Subject Area exam(s) and ESOL exam (if seeking an ESOL endorsement) and Special Education (if seeking a Special Education Generalist endorsement)

EDUC 496 SEMINAR FOR FULL-TIME STUDENT TEACHING (1 credit)

Reflection on how theory is put into practice throughout the full-time student teaching experience. Examination and collaborative problem-solving of issues and challenges in P-12 school systems. Preparation for entering the teaching profession, graduate school and other opportunities post-graduation. Taken concurrently with Full-Time Student Teaching.

EDUC 497 SEMINAR FOR PART-TIME STUDENT TEACHING (1 credit)

Reflection on how theory is put into practice throughout the part-time student teaching experience. Examination and collaborative problem-solving of issues and challenges in P-12 school systems. Support and scaffolding of teacher assessment. Taken concurrently with Part-Time Student Teaching.

EDUC 498 SPECIAL TOPICS: JAN TERM TRAVEL (4 credits)

Topics vary according to faculty availability and interest. The major topic offered in the past has been Multicultural Experiences in Education, which has taken place in Hawaii, Montana, England, and Puerto Rico. Offered only as student interest and university resources permit. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Prerequisites: IDST 098 previous fall.

EDUC 510 FOUNDATIONS OF INCLUSION & SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)

An introduction to special education in today's schools, including inclusion, the purpose and history of special education, development, and the process to identify and serve students in need of specially designed instruction. This overview of special education will explore the etiology, characteristics and needs of students with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, emotional or behavioral disorders, autism spectrum disorders, communication disorders, deafness and hearing loss, blindness and low vision, physical handicaps, health impairments, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and traumatic brain injury. Addresses the continuum of services ranging from early childhood special education to transitions to adulthood. Typically offered: annually in summer and fall.

Prerequisites: Admission into Linfield Graduate Special Education Generalist Endorsement Program.

EDUC 540 FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING LINQUISTICALLY CULTURALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS (3 credits)

This course is an overview of linguistically and culturally appropriate teaching strategies for teaching English Language Learning (ELL) students in mainstream classrooms. A key component of this overview is an examination of current language learning theories and the application of these theories for planning effective instruction for Emerging Bilinguals (EBs) and English Learners (ELs). This course is also an exploration of dimensions of race, culture, categories of social diversity, characteristics of the culture of schools, of the candidates, and the school-related dilemmas of stigmatized social groups. Readings and experiential assignments are for the purpose of expanding participants' understandings of race, language, and culture as well as enabling them to examine their own identity in relation to their teaching and pedagogy. Prerequisites: Admission into Linfield Graduate ESOL Endorsement Program. Typically offered: annually in summer or fall. OFFERED THROUGH ONLINE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (OCE) ONLY.

Prerequisites: Admission into Linfield Graduate ESOL Endorsement Program.

EDUC 545 LINGUISTICS FOR TEACHERS (3 credits)

In-depth guided practice in identifying the various aspects of language: sound system, grammar system, lexicon, and language functions. Guided analysis of English phonological system, English grammar and grammar terminology. Application of this knowledge will be connected to questions of assessing students' language, supporting language development, and direct teaching about language. Typically offered: annually in summer or fall. OFFERED THROUGH ONLINE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (OCE) ONLY.

Prerequisites: Admission into Linfield Graduate ESOL Endorsement Program.

EDUC 550 LANGUAGE, POWER, AND ADVOCACY FOR ESOL (3 credits)

Broader issues of language and power impact bilingual students' cultural identities. Effective teachers of Emergent Bilingual (EB) students need to advocate for EB students, their families, classrooms, schools, and communities. Based on critical readings of research-based programs and English-language proficiency standards, this course will examine the history of laws and trends toward EB students in relation to current attitudes and policies in the United States. This course will give educators the tools to advocate for equity and social justice in their own classrooms and beyond. Typically offered: annually in spring or summer. OFFERED THROUGH ONLINE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (OCE) ONLY.

Prerequisites: Admission into Linfield Graduate ESOL Endorsement Program.

EDUC 580 PLANNING, IMPLEMENTING, AND ASSESSING FOR ESOL (3 credits)

Current curriculum models, materials, teaching approaches and assessment techniques that maximize the language development and academic achievement of English language learners. Emphasizes strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing instruction that enable students in different proficiency levels to access the core curriculum and develop language skills. OFFERED THROUGH ONLINE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION (OCE) ONLY.

Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate ESOL Endorsement Program; EDUC 540.

EDUC 590 ESOL PRACTICUM (2 credits)

The Linfield ESOL Practicum Experience is an in-depth examination of a candidate's knowledge, skills and dispositions required for informed and effective instruction of Emerging Bilinguals (EBs) and English Learners (ELs). The purpose of the practicum is to provide the opportunity to demonstrate skills and methods that enhance learning for multilingual students and engage teachers in reflective and skilled practice. Using an English language development (ELD) focus, candidates are expected to satisfactorily design and implement instruction specifically crafted for EBs/ELs under the supervision of a Linfield College Supervisor. Candidate performance is measured through a proficiency based field rubric that measures the TESOL standards formally assessed in the Linfield Graduate ESOL program. The practicum experience also includes a narrative case study component, which provides a structure for data collection and personal reflection on professional practice.

Prerequisites: Admission into Linfield Graduate ESOL Endorsement Program and completion of all courses with a grade of "C" or higher.